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Drayage Brokersin New York City, NY

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Because a drayage load can mean a few different things, confusion among carriers is common. Many carriers link drayage with going into a port, but that isn't always true. While all drayage loads typically originate from a port of entry, there are often several legs of a drayage journey before a container turns up at its final stop. Legs of a drayage load may include:

Why Are Drayage Companies in New York City, NY So Important?

You may be thinking, what's so important about drayage? It's such a small step in the container storage transport process. In reality, it's an integral piece needed in the logistics industry and a crucial part of U.S. supply chain management.

To truly understand the importance of drayage, let's use flowers as an example. Most cut flower shipments enter the market from areas in South America until they end up at Dutch auction houses. Once there, wholesalers purchase flowers in bulk and send those products to retail outlets worldwide. Because flowers are perishable, they typically need to be refrigerated and are often shipped in reefer containers. These refrigerated vessels must maintain a certain temp to prevent loss.

Drayage companies like RelyEx allow flower shippers to send their products from Argentinian ports to airports in the Netherlands with peace of mind because their products are protected. The only way to accomplish this feat is with the help of swift, meticulous port drayage services. Drayage companies allow flower shippers to send their products from Argentinian ports to airports in the Netherlands with peace of mind, because their products are protected. The only way to accomplish this feat is with the help of swift, meticulous port drayage services.

If port drayage is compromised, it can cause delays and even fines. You know the packages you get delivered to your front door from apps like Amazon? Without drayage and drayage brokers, one or two-day shipping times wouldn't even be possible.

As a multi-billion-dollar industry in the U.S. alone, it seems like drayage shipping issues shouldn't exist. But the fact is inefficiencies and congestion are still major problems at ports. Whether it's a lack of carriers, absent chassis, or overburdened terminals, delays lead to missed deadlines, lost revenue, and worse.

But anytime challenges exist, so too do innovative solutions.

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RelyEx Solves Problems

At RelyEx, we like to consider ourselves problem solvers. The nature of the container drayage industry presents new challenges every day, but we're firm believers that there's a solution to every hurdle we encounter. And while some drayage businesses implement a reactive approach, RelyEx customers choose us for our proactive mindset. We take pride in solving your company's drayage challenges to help you avoid frustrating fees, missed expectations, and delayed shipments. We strive to make every transaction successful and streamlined by partnering with shippers who prioritize transparent, prompt, and accurate communication.

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RelyEx Has a Unique Vantage Point

RelyEx approaches your business from the customer's perspective - a unique approach that helps us provide high-quality, effective drayage services. We've been in the customers' shoes, know their pain points, and because of that, provide first-hand solutions to stressful supply chain issues. With over 30 years of collective knowledge, our team excels in:

  • Inventory Management
  • Logistics
  • Purchasing
  • Finance

Our varied, high-level drayage shipping experience helps us achieve our overarching goal: expertly managing your freight movement needs. That way, you can direct your time and focus on growing the core aspects of your business while we handle the heavy lifting. Throw in proactive planning to avoid bottleneck situations and strong communication for transparent customer relations, and you can see why so many companies trust RelyEx.

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RelyEx Nurtures Strong Carrier Relationships

When it comes to shipping logistics, it only takes one mistake by a mediocre worker to disrupt your business. That's why, at RelyEx, we pride ourselves on forming and nurturing relationships with carriers who match our standards of care. Our founding partner started his career transporting freight for companies as an on-demand carrier. He uses that knowledge to maximize the resources of our carriers so that our customer's expectations aren't just met - they're exceeded.

Based in the port city of New York City, RelyEx has a keen understanding of the challenges of managing the inbound and outbound flow of containers. Our team of container drayage experts provides your business with unique solutions to nuanced shipping problems, minimizing demurrage and ensuring the successful delivery of your freight.

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Customers choose RelyEx because:

  • We are a reliable drayage logistics partner that manages your freight from beginning to end
  • We have a rare industry vantage point with 30+ years of client-side experience
  • We foster and fortify the strongest vendor relations
  • We take a proactive approach to problem-solving, not a reactive approach
Let us know how we can help.
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Container Services New York City, NY

Your Drayage Shipments Managed from Start to Finish

Some drayage brokers don't care how customers feel about their service as long as they sign a contract and get paid. As a solutions-oriented team, RelyEx takes the opposite approach. We're motivated by the opportunity to overachieve for our customers and to provide them with the best logistics experience possible. With professional experience as carriers and shippers ourselves, we know the roadblocks and challenges you're facing. We excel at mapping out the best plans of action to solve those problems. But that's just the start.

Our tracking experts monitor and manage every aspect of your drayage shipment from booking to delivery, 24/7. Once booked, we look for the availability of your containers hourly once they're at port. When they arrive, our team acts quickly to access your storage containers when they're available.

Plus, RelyEx ensures your company's requirements are met by the carrier during loading and delivery and provide necessary documentation as fast as possible. With real-time tracking updates and access to our customer service professionals, your team has complete visibility throughout the shipping process.

We Source Top-Notch Operators at the Best Prices

Over the years, RelyEx has built a strong network of drayage carriers, transloading locations, and container storage spaces to provide you with the best possible options to match your drayage service needs. We know that searching for quality service presents an added layer of complexity and stress to our customers. That's why we work hard to take that off your plate by connecting you with our reliable shipping partners.

With a background moving freight as an on-demand carrier, our founding partner understands how to maximize the resources and equipment of our carriers to match your needs.

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We Make Transparent, Timely Communication a Priority

Like other industries, the global logistics space is complex. Mistakes will be made, and problems will happen. With those truths in mind, RelyEx has built its reputation as problem solvers. Unlike other drayage companies, we don't shy away from this industry's complexities because we take pride in solving problems. Even better, we aim to do what's needed to avoid those problems altogether.

As your logistics partner, we will provide your company with accurate, transparent, and prompt communication. If there are unexpected issues, we'll notify you immediately and will provide several options to remedy the problem. We even offer custom reporting for large clients who need at-the-moment updates and quick access to shipment documentation.

We Have Robust Project Management Experience

Why let the unpredictability of your industry dictate your success? With a background working in manufacturing, our founders are familiar with the demands of managing production schedules and sales orders. That experience makes it abundantly clear to us that every business and industry is different. If you struggle with seasonal surges or other factors, our team supports your business with a mapped-out plan and schedule, so you stay ahead of the game.

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Paperwork Errors

Typically, shippers need four specific documents to clear shipments through customs: A Bill of Lading (or BOL), a commercial invoice, a packing list, and an arrival notice. Seasoned drayage brokers like RelyEx are used to preparing these documents, but new shippers tend to miss this step due to inexperience.

Payment Delays

If a shipper only pays for part of their shipment, a vessel operator may refuse to release their freight until their bill is fully paid. Payment delays lead to cargo detention at the port of entry, which triggers demurrage charges.

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Documents Received Too Late

Paperwork is needed when you're shipping goods with a drayage company. When documents like the Certificate of Origin or Bill of Lading arrive at their destination late, you can expect demurrage fees. RelyEx avoids this situation entirely by being proactive when submitting paperwork.

Additional causes for demurrage fees can include:

  • Damaged Container Storage
  • Custom Released Containers
  • Storage Containers Are Too Heavy

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RelyEx:

The Supply Chain Partner You Can Count On

At RelyEx, we know first-hand how stressful supply chain problems can be for business owners. Though drayage shipping might seem minor on the surface, it affects every stage of your shipping process. And when inevitable hurdles manifest, RelyEx propels you over the proverbial roadblocks with a proactive mindset and a passion for challenging projects. We believe that all problems have a solution, and our unique vantage point allows us to provide first-hand solutions to customers in a wide array of industries.

When it comes to your business, don't settle for anything less than RelyEx. Contact our office today to learn more about how we make your shipping experience streamlined and stress-free.

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Modular Portland Loo Toilets Are Finally Coming to New York City

Nearly four years after floating the possibility, the city Department of Parks and Recreation is preparing for a trial run of prefabricated, kiosk-like bathrooms that cost a fraction of the multimillion-dollar price tag for building traditional restrooms.The five Portland Loo toilets, made by an Oregon-based metal firm, cost roughly $185,000 each, according to a Parks Department spokesperson.But the overall budget to buy and install five Portland Loos, in one pilot location in each borough, starting as early as summer 20...

Nearly four years after floating the possibility, the city Department of Parks and Recreation is preparing for a trial run of prefabricated, kiosk-like bathrooms that cost a fraction of the multimillion-dollar price tag for building traditional restrooms.

The five Portland Loo toilets, made by an Oregon-based metal firm, cost roughly $185,000 each, according to a Parks Department spokesperson.

But the overall budget to buy and install five Portland Loos, in one pilot location in each borough, starting as early as summer 2024, could reach as much as $5.3 million.

And strict New York City building code restrictions on prefabricated construction have dragged out getting potties to parks, a Parks spokesperson acknowledged. A sales manager for Portland Loo’s manufacturer, Madden Fabrication, told THE CITY that securing approval in New York was more difficult than in any other location the company has worked in.

“I built 180 of these, from Portland to Alaska to Miami, and I’ve never had this certification problem,” Evan Madden told THE CITY. “New York City has been the most difficult to have a permit approved for.”

A former parks commissioner first proposed the prefab potties in 2019 as a cost-saving measure after THE CITY highlighted the shocking $4.7 million cost of building a single comfort station in The Bronx.

Parks Department spokesperson Meghan Lalor said the budgeted Portland Loo price tag included costs for running new electric and water lines to the units, along with prep work, foundation work and other construction needs.

The modular bathrooms resemble curved newspaper kiosks, with slatted sides that are intended to provide needed privacy, but also enough sightlines to dissuade illicit behavior. They include a baby-changing table and a separate hand-washing station, documents show.

The proposed sites for the trial run are Irving Square Park in Bushwick, Brooklyn; Thomas Jefferson Park in East Harlem, Manhattan; Hoyt Playground in Astoria, Queens; Father Macris Park in Graniteville, Staten Island; and Joyce Kilmer Park near Yankee Stadium in The Bronx.

Lalor said the agency is still finalizing the site design while getting required approvals from community boards and the Public Design Commission before moving to procure the units.

“We are installing Portland Loos in one park in each borough, in areas specifically chosen because they did not previously have bathrooms,” said Lalor. “This is a pilot to determine the feasibility of using this model in the future as an economical solution to building bathrooms in parks.”

Building Barriers

In East Harlem, Manhattan Community Board 11 wrote a letter supporting Thomas Jefferson Park’s inclusion in the pilot. Even so, a number of its members questioned why the long-underserved neighborhood wasn’t getting a traditionally built comfort station, as the board had requested.

“While Community Board 11 supports this restroom, the implementation of the ‘Portland Loo’ should not serve as a permanent alternative to a full comfort station structure as requested in the CB11 Statement of District Needs,” board chair Xavier Santiago wrote last week in a letter to the Parks Department. “It is important that historically disadvantaged communities like East Harlem receive equitable resources in the implementation of these initiatives such that the quality and quantity of resources provided are commensurate with other Manhattan districts.”

Presenting the project at a recent online CB11 meeting, a Parks project manager and designer, Chad McNeil, informed members that even the prefab units are not as affordable as they might at first appear. “We have funding available — about a million dollars per site — which might be shocking to some, but utility connections are what drive the costs of these,” McNeil said.

Former Parks Commissioner Mitchell Silver said in November 2019, following a City Council hearing, that the agency was exploring the idea of installing smaller, stand-alone bathrooms. THE CITY had called attention to the spiraling cost of comfort station construction earlier that year.

Cities across North America have turned to the Portland Loo as a cheaper alternative to new bathroom construction. The units have been installed in about 90 locations in the U.S. and Canada, according to a website marketing the units, including in nearby Hoboken, N.J., and Shelter Island, Long Island.

Madden, the loo fabricator, told THE CITY he didn’t hear a peep from New York City officials until February 2022, when one of them angrily called and asked why the firm wasn’t providing the potties.

The short answer: Nobody had ordered them.

Madden said NYC Department of Buildings (DOB) rules require that a pre-approved fabricator assemble the units — or that they be inspected by a special inspector registered with the agency — but that he couldn’t find any manufacturers on the list provided by the city willing to do so. He ended up having to get a fabricator certified by DOB, which took some time.

Buildings officials said the use of a pre-approved fabricator or special inspector is a requirement for any structure that’s assembled outside of the five boroughs and shipped here, in order to ensure it complies with city codes and regulations.

The list of approved fabricators currently contains 125 firms, but is divided into four specialties: Metal buildings, steel, modular and precast.

Lalor acknowledged that challenges in finding a fabricator caused the delay — an issue she said wasn’t resolved until September.

She also said the Parks Department has been exploring other faster and cheaper restroom options. Those include piloting a modular comfort station in Staten Island that was constructed completely indoors — avoiding weather delays — as well as a composting toilet that’s been installed in Fresh Kills Park.

Rising Costs

As THE CITY has reported, the cost of installing what are known as “comfort stations” in city parks ballooned before the pandemic — from an average cost of $1.3 million in 2011 to $3.6 million as of 2018.

Currently five comfort stations in the construction pipeline carry estimated costs between $5 million and $10 million. And one planned for the velodrome in Kissena Park in Queens has an estimated cost of more than $10 million.

Then-Mayor Bill de Blasio said in response to the reporting that the procurement rules and red tape that bog down the process for building parks projects would have to change.

Lalor said the agency has since taken a number of steps to cut costs — including standardizing designs, eliminating pricey or custom items, and limiting the length of utility runs that connect comfort stations to water and electric lines.

However, she said, the Kissena Park comfort station would require a long utility line because of a lack of suitable areas to install the restroom, which is contributing an estimated $5 million to the overall cost.

These public restroom challenges aren’t limited to parks, however.

Last year, THE CITY reported that just five of 20 automatic sidewalks toilets purchased under the administration of Mayor Michael Bloomberg in 2006 had been installed.

Officials at the city’s Department of Transportation, which is responsible for the sidewalk toilets, didn’t respond to a request for an update.

Hall of Famer Joe Klecko thinks Aaron Rodgers could 'absolutely' ruin Jets locker room

As the rumors pick up regarding Aaron Rodgers' future, one that has especially been picking up steam is the four-time MVP quarterback being shipped to the quarterback-coveting Jets.It's an idea to which former Jets defensive lineman and Pro Football Hall of Famer Joe Klecko gives an emphatic thumbs down.While speaking on CBS Sports Radio's "Zach Gelb Show," Klecko said he thi...

As the rumors pick up regarding Aaron Rodgers' future, one that has especially been picking up steam is the four-time MVP quarterback being shipped to the quarterback-coveting Jets.

It's an idea to which former Jets defensive lineman and Pro Football Hall of Famer Joe Klecko gives an emphatic thumbs down.

While speaking on CBS Sports Radio's "Zach Gelb Show," Klecko said he thinks Rodgers and the Jets aren't a good match and that Rodgers could "absolutely" ruin the locker room dynamic.

"I don't think Rodgers is a fit with the young guys," Klecko said. "I relate this to myself with a young team that came up when we started winning. Why it was a good fit for all of us was because we all worked together and came up together."

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Klecko was quick to acknowledge Rodgers' credentials calling him a "great player," and adding, "you don't become an MVP (four) times without doing what he's done."

But Klecko also said that Rodgers' "condescending" attitude when he doesn't have the perfect arrangement with receivers and game plan is something the Jets don't need.

"(Receiver Garrett) Wilson won rookie of the year, offensive player. I can't see him coming back to the huddle and Rodgers lambasting him for running the wrong route," Klecko said. "It's not gonna fit. I don't see it."

Klecko added that he could see Derek Carr, who was recently released by the Raiders, being a better match.

"I just can't see them going after a guy that has had all his years and had his way and when it doesn't turn out his way he goes dark," Klecko said. "I just can't see it."

When Gelb asked if Klecko could see Rodgers ruining the locker room, Klecko said: "Absolutely. You got a young bunch of guys (who) are fighting with each other, and you bring a guy in who has his own opinion about things. I think that could turn a bad feeling in that locker room."

Klecko starred with the Jets from 1977-88, winning defensive player of the year in 1981 when he led the league in sacks. He was announced as a member of this year's Hall of Fame class earlier this month.

‘Mama, I Want to Sing!’ Returns for 40th Anniversary

Ahmaya Knoelle Higginson first appeared onstage before she was even born. Her mother, Vy Higginsen, a co-writer of the gospel musical “Mama, I Want to Sing!,” was pregnant with Higginson in 1983 as she performed in the show about a preacher’s daughter who becomes a pop sensation. When Higginson was a toddler, she waddled backstage during the musical’s international tours, and at the age of 10 she joined its choir for performances at Madison Square Garden. Then as a teenager, she stepped into the lead role of Doris Win...

Ahmaya Knoelle Higginson first appeared onstage before she was even born. Her mother, Vy Higginsen, a co-writer of the gospel musical “Mama, I Want to Sing!,” was pregnant with Higginson in 1983 as she performed in the show about a preacher’s daughter who becomes a pop sensation. When Higginson was a toddler, she waddled backstage during the musical’s international tours, and at the age of 10 she joined its choir for performances at Madison Square Garden. Then as a teenager, she stepped into the lead role of Doris Winter.

“I ended up being a product of my environment,” Higginson said. “Whether I heard the music from the womb or not.”

Now, Higginson, 39, is directing a revival of “Mama, I Want to Sing!,” which is celebrating its 40th anniversary with a nearly three-week run. The performances, also coinciding with Black History Month, will run through March 12 at El Museo’s El Teatro, formerly the Heckscher Theater, where the 1983 musical ran for years in the ’80s.

Higginsen, who created the production with her husband, Ken Wydro, said she could not have predicted that her daughter, as director, would carry on the show’s legacy. But it’s no surprise she did: Her daughter, “saw every iteration, saw every singer, every star,” Higginsen said, adding, “Who’s more capable to direct the show at this stage than she is?”

Higginson leaned into her mother as they spoke about the show’s evolution during a recent interview at the Mama Foundation for the Arts in Harlem, an organization created by Higginsen to preserve and promote Black music through free educational programming.

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“Mama, I Want to Sing!” is a family affair. The story was inspired by Doris Troy, Higginsen’s older sister, who was a choir girl in her father’s Harlem church and later became a soul singer, known for her 1960s chart hit “Just One Look.” (Troy played the role of her mother in the musical from 1984 to 1998, before her death from emphysema in 2004.) The musical also has deep roots in Harlem, with a fictional Doris finding her voice at Mount Calvary Church and auditioning at the Apollo Theater.

More on N.Y.C. Theater, Music and Dance This Spring

From 1983 to 1991, the musical had more than 2,800 performances at the Heckscher Theater, and Higginsen said she still remembered lifting the chains from the theater, which had previously been shuttered, scrubbing dirt and dust from the seats. “At first we didn’t know whether it was going to work, but then the word of mouth spread like wildfire.”

The success of “Mama, I Want to Sing!” led to national and international tours, with stops in Switzerland, Germany, Italy, Japan and London. Then came the 1990 sequel, about Doris Winter’s marriage and first child, and the 1996 production of “Born to Sing: Mama III,” which followed Doris’s international tour and her teenage daughter’s singing aspirations.

All along, Higginsen said, she was thinking of the show’s legacy. She wanted the next generation to become ambassadors of gospel, jazz and R&B music, starting with her daughter, who has gone from performing onstage to sitting in the director’s chair.

“This story begs to be told in an authentic way,” Higginsen said, “to really pay tribute to the music, to pay tribute to the artists that came before us, and to make sure that people recognize the contribution that African American music has made to the American musical landscape.”

The Rev. Richard Hartley, who plays Rev. Winter in the current production, first joined the show in 1987 as a member of the musical’s church choir, and later took on other roles, including the narrator and the boisterous choir director.

“This is an American institution,” Hartley said, “and to be a part of it — and it’s Black History Month — it’s just so fulfilling.”

To cast the next Doris for the show’s latest iteration, Higginson began a nationwide search last year but it was unsuccessful. The people who came to audition were overrehearsed, she said, and she craved the vulnerability and authenticity that earlier productions had. (The last version of the show to be performed onstage was a 2013 production of “Mama, I Want to Sing: The Next Generation,” in Japan.)

Then in November, after consulting a colleague who teaches at Fiorello H. LaGuardia High School of Music & Art and Performing Arts, she visited the school on a Tuesday and auditioned 20 students in the hallway.

“People say expect the unexpected,” Higginson said. “I could see that on their face, but that’s exactly what we wanted.”

Faith Cochrane, a 16-year-old junior and vocal major, said she was eating lunch when Higginson arrived. She was nervous, she said, and didn’t hit all of the notes in her audition song, “Amazing Grace.” But Higginson was impressed by her potential, and Cochrane was asked to join the production. She is now one of three teenage performers — including Elise Silva and Asa Sulton — alternating in the role of the young starlet.

“Something that I had to work on was really stepping outside of my comfort zone,” Cochrane said. “But when I did, the response from everyone else was really good and it made me feel better.”

During rehearsals in Harlem last week, Higginson led the Sing Harlem choir, instructing them to stand tall, jive to the rhythm, and hit sharp staccato notes. In between scenes, the three teenagers playing Doris giggled and danced, bouncing their shoulders and stomping their feet. And as different performers sang solos, choir members clapped and fanned in approval. Higginson and her mother could feel the spirit of Troy in the room, Higginson said, and she was grateful to breathe life into the gospel musical once again.

“I’ve been in the spotlight for so long,” she added. “The awesome part is to see the flower grow.”

A Short Menu That Shows Vision in Fidi

IfIf you’ve really explored the verdant, hilly byways of Tuscany, you know that the eating opportunities are not confined to historic osterias and roadside rotisseries. More innovative places are tucked away here and there that tinker with the country’s cuisine while rarely attracting tourists. Now modern Tuscan cooking has arrived on Wall Street at Etrusca, located at 53 Stone Street — a cobbled Dutch alleyway dating to the 1600s known more for its gastropubs and pizzerias than for fine dining.The chef is ...

IfIf you’ve really explored the verdant, hilly byways of Tuscany, you know that the eating opportunities are not confined to historic osterias and roadside rotisseries. More innovative places are tucked away here and there that tinker with the country’s cuisine while rarely attracting tourists. Now modern Tuscan cooking has arrived on Wall Street at Etrusca, located at 53 Stone Street — a cobbled Dutch alleyway dating to the 1600s known more for its gastropubs and pizzerias than for fine dining.

The chef is Elisa Da Prato, who spent her childhood shuttling between El Paso, Texas, and Barga, Italy, a hilltop town in Tuscany’s northwest. Eventually she ended up living in Brooklyn, where she began her career doing pop-ups. Come 2018, she returned to Barga and opened Elisa, just off the town’s piazza, an experimental Tuscan trattoria where she regaled customers by seasoning with wild flowers and powdered tree barks. Now, Elisa is closed and Da Prato has moved back to New York.

The name Etrusca is evocative of the ancient past of Tuscany, a region honeycombed with Etruscan tombs, where Etruscan ideas, including culinary ones, flow like an underground river, popping up in unexpected places — and the most unexpected so far is on Stone Street. The restaurant has no sign to speak of, but a gray facade with cream-colored window frames and a tiny piece of paper in one mullioned window that says Etrusca. An interior deep and low-ceilinged runs all the way to William Street. Inside, it looks like a Tuscan farmhouse with bunches of dried herbs and ropes of garlic on the walls, and flickering candles on rustic wooden tables. Shelves of wine bottles complete the picture.

How does this welter of the chef’s experiences translate to the menu? The bill of fare offers four sections, and one is well advised to select one dish from each. The first section is cheese and charcuterie collections. The salumi platter ($42) looks like the Tuscan landscape seen from a helicopter, with lonza (cured pork loin), lardo, coppa, prosciutello, and salami in streaky white and pink hillocks draped with pickled fennel and sauteed scallions. Stalks of rosemary imitate miniature pine trees, and their aroma rises up as the cured meats arrive on a wooden paddle.

The multi-cheese platter is not quite so good, amped with pear butter and sage, but goes nicely with a bottle of wine. On a recent visit, another selection had appeared, la Tur ($18) — a soft creamy cheese of cow, goat, and sheep’s milk that flows slowly over a plate accented with onion ash, cocoa, and honey, in many ways the perfect intro to the chef’s novel approach to Italian cooking.

Appetizers, five in number, read like poems. If you want something that feels Etruscan, consider the beef marrow bones. They arrive sprinkled with porcini powder and armed with “swords of bread” — elongated toasts perfect for scooping out the jellied, encrusted, and smoky marrow. Then there’s the coarsely chopped beef tartare with — surprise! — New Mexican green chiles, proving that Da Prato didn’t spend all that time in El Paso for nothing. Best of all the antipasti is a plate of dark Spanish anchovies splayed like a rib cage, interspersed with grapes and toasted almonds.

The menu turns more spare with three pastas in the third course, and two entrees in the fourth. These courses are both so good that any pair of primi and secondi will satisfy. But don’t skip the pastas expecting a giant secondo – they are relatively small. My favorite pasta was surely maccheroni limone e lavanda ($28). It consists of fresh pasta sheets piled like just-washed bed linens, lubricated with lots of good butter and folded with lemon, lavender, chamomile, and rose. It’s like falling asleep in a spring meadow.

If in search of something heartier and more conventional, lumache (snail-shaped pasta) come inundated with a chunky ragu of beef and pork wherein herbs and cheese strongly skew the mellow but meaty flavor.

Now, if you’re searching for something small and exquisite as a secondo, go for the quail ($32). A pair of birds has been butchered so that the breasts and legs form four small pieces. These have been lightly breaded and fried like tempura, each piece providing an exquisite bite or two. Alternately, a pair of thick double-bone lamb chops come propped with roasted bulbs of fennel and onion. They’re about the most succulent lamb chops you’ve ever tasted, and at $52 can be shared nicely between two diners.

All that’s left to eat is dessert, and the best choice is a torta alla montovana, a cake made with almond flour, simple and austere and topped with powdered sugar. After surveying Etrusca’s wild flavor combinations, its plain taste is like landing after a glorious balloon ride over the sunflower-carpeted Tuscan hills.

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Rangers’ K’Andre Miller ejected after spitting on Kings’ Drew Doughty

New York Rangers defenseman K’Andre Miller was given a five-minute major and ejected from the game after spitting on Los Angeles Kings defenseman ...

New York Rangers defenseman K’Andre Miller was given a five-minute major and ejected from the game after spitting on Los Angeles Kings defenseman Drew Doughty. The Rangers went on to win 5-2 at Madison Square Garden. Here’s what you need to know:

Miller with a match penalty for spitting at Doughty – first time we've seen this since Hathaway/Gudbranson?

NYR down to 4D with Schneider's roster management benching… pic.twitter.com/w6lgBm5Ers

— Shayna (@hayyyshayyy) February 26, 2023

Background

“I was just shocked obviously, and then I don’t even know if I said anything to him after but I just immediately went to the ref to try to get the penalty. You don’t want to see things like that in this game.” Doughty said to reporters postgame. “I don’t know if I’ve ever seen that. It’s unfortunate and whether or not he meant to do that, I have no idea but it’s a pretty big loogie on my face so I was pretty pissed.”

The Rangers played the rest of Sunday’s game with just four defensemen. Because of limited cap space as they attempt to trade for Chicago Blackhawks star Patrick Kane, Braden Schneider dressed but was held out by the Blueshirts for cap-management reasons.

They were also without Ryan Lindgren, who was hurt on a hit by Washington’s T.J. Oshie in Saturday’s loss to the Capitals. Forward Ryan Carpenter also dressed and did not take a shift.

After Miller was ejected, New York played the balance of its game against the Kings with Adam Fox, Jacob Trouba, Ben Harpur and newcomer Niko Mikkola. Mikkola recently came from St. Louis with Vladimir Tarasenko in a trade Feb. 9.

How does this impact Miller?

It’s an ugly look for Miller, who has emerged as a big part of the Rangers’ blue line in his third season. The 23-year-old native of St. Paul, Minn., has six goals and already established a career-high of 30 points in 60 games.

Miller ranks third on the Rangers in hits with 130 and his average ice time of 22 minutes, 11 seconds sits only second behind star blueliner Adam Fox.

All match penalties assessed are reviewed by NHL commissioner Gary Bettman and Miller could receive supplementary discipline given existing precedent like the Hathaway-Gudbranson incident a little more than three years ago. — Stephens

How does this impact the Rangers?

In the immediate term, New York took care of business in stopping a four-game winless streak with its victory over L.A. But the Rangers are already playing with less than a full deck. General manager Chris Drury is trying to bring Kane in and has had to do some roster gymnastics with his club pressed right up against the salary cap.

Both Schneider and Carpenter are waiver-eligible so they will be sent to the AHL’s Hartford Wolf Pack in what will essentially be a paper transaction.

Meanwhile, the Rangers are already without Lindgren and may not have Miller, if there is additional disciplined levied, for upcoming games Wednesday at Philadelphia and Thursday at home against Ottawa (and possibly Saturday at Boston). — Stephens

Required reading

(Bruce Bennett/ Getty Images)

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